Tavis Campbell

Dr. Tavis Campbell, PhD

Positions

Member

Libin Cardiovascular Institute

Member

Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute

Affiliations

Adjunct Professor

Cumming School of Medicine, Department of Oncology

Contact information

Web presence

Phone number

Office: 403.988.0706

Location

Office: AD225

Background

Educational Background

B.S. Psychology, Concordia University,

PhD Clinical Psychology, McGill University,

Biography

Dr. Tavis Campbell is a Professor of Clinical Psychology and Oncology at the University of Calgary. He obtained his Ph.D. from McGill University and completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Duke University Medical Centre. His research interests involve identifying and understanding the bio-behavioural mechanisms involved in the development, progression, and management of chronic diseases, such as hypertension, cancer and insomnia.

Dr. Campbell has published results from several behaviour-based RCTs in the areas of cancer, pain, and chronic disease management, including the i-can sleep trial targeting insomnia in cancer survivors. In addition, he has held several leadership roles in national organizations, including Chair of Care Delivery for Hypertension Canada and Chair of the Health section of the Canadian Psychological Association. He is a service consultant with the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Indigenous Services Canada. Campbell has also served as a consultant to the Calgary Emergency Management Agency on public communications.

Dr. Campbell is extensively involved in training efforts aimed at a variety of healthcare professionals (e.g., cardiologists, rheumatologists, nurses, dermatologists) on motivating health behaviour change and improving patient-provider communication.

Research

Areas of Research

Area of Focus
  • Behavioural medicine
  • Chronic disease
  • Cardiac rehabilitation
  • Biobehaviours
  • Clinical trials
  • Health behaviours

Courses

Course number Course title Semester
PSYC 659 Ethics and Professional Issues Winter 2024

Projects

The iPROTECT Study: Developing and testing an online intervention to improve the uptake and maintenance of personal protective behaviours against COVID-19

The purpose of this project is to design, develop, and test a brief web-based intervention to improve adherence to personal protective behaviours related to COVID-19 prevention among the Canadian general population, with a focus on physical distancing, face masks and vaccination, and to examine the differential effect of this approach among young adults (25 and younger) and males who are at higher risk for non-adherence to protective behaviours. Funding for this project was received by the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR), COVID-19 Research Gaps and Priorities Grant.


Small Changes in Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) – A Community-based Adaptation of the Small Changes Behavioural Weight Loss Treatment Approach for Psoriatic Arthritis Patients with Comorbid Obesity

The purpose of the Small Changes in PsA study is to develop and test a small-changes behavioral weight loss approach for patients with PsA and obesity. This two-part study consists of a (1) a qualitative investigation to explore barriers and facilitators to behavioural weight loss treatment among patients with PsA and obesity, and (2) a randomized controlled trial to test whether patients who participate in the behavioural weight loss program are more likely to lose weight compared with those who receive treatment as usual from their community rheumatology clinic. This study is being done in collaboration with co-investigators Dr. Michelle Teo and Dr. Lesley Lutes.


Evaluating the efficacy of intranasal oxytocin on pain and function among individuals who experience chronic pain: A multisite, placebo - controlled, blinded, sequential, within - subjects crossover trial

This RCT is evaluating the efficacy of intranasal oxytocin versus placebo in improving outcomes among women with chronic pelvic pain. The primary objective is to investigate oxytocin’s efficacy in reducing pain among women with chronic pelvic pain. Secondary objectives include investigating oxytocin’s efficacy in improving emotional function, physical function, and sleep among these women. This study is being done in collaboration with co-investigator Dr. Joshua Rash.


A BEhavioural WEight Loss I n tervention delivered in Cardiac Rehabilitation for patients with Atrial Fibrillation and obesity: The BE WEL IN CR–AF Study

The purpose of the BE-WEL in CR-AF study is to develop and test a small-changes behavioral weight loss approach for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and obesity attending a cardiac rehabilitation program. This two-part study consists of a (1) a qualitative investigation to explore barriers and facilitators to behavioural weight loss treatment among patients with AF and obesity, and (2) a randomized controlled trial to test whether patients who receive the behavioural weight loss component during their cardiac rehabilitation program, are more likely to lose 10% of their body weight than those who do cardiac rehab alone. Recruitment for Part I is currently underway. 

Awards

  • Fellow, Canadian Psychological Association. 2020
  • Fellow, Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. 2016
  • Established Researcher Award, Faculty of Arts, University of Calgary. 2016

Publications

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